photography

color blocking // y e l l o w by jamie atlas

It’s SPRING and the birds are chirping and the flowers are popping and…it’s been raining quite a bit lately, actually…but sunshine is slowly and surely burning through the clouds. So it’s a fitting time to round out my color blocked gallery series with YELLOW. It’s a self-indulgent and satisfying exercise to pour over your own previous work and play different images against each other. Some of these images were produced years ago, but many are from the last year or so…and all are available for license. You can find my work at Getty, Tetra Images, and Stocksy United.

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cocktail // agave margaritas by jamie atlas

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Okay, I’m a day late for cinco de mayo…but I think it’s always a good day to drink a margarita. Also, this marks the first day of my BIRTH WEEK! Yes, I celebrate a week, not a day…and this year’s a big one, so maybe I’ll just usurp the remainder of May. This is the best margarita recipe ever - simple and perfect - which I photographed back in Marisa’s and my blogging days. Head over there for the recipe, and start counting down days til the weekend! Cheers!

color blocking // g r e e n by jamie atlas

As I’ve mentioned before, I came up with the idea of organizing galleries by color, for no real reason at all. It’s so refreshing to look over past work and see how different images harmonize with each other. And color is basically the thing I’m most inspired by when shooting, so it seems as good a theme as any. Now that spring is here, Earth Day on the horizon, GREEN seemed like the natural next one. These are images from my commercial work spanning the last few years. You can license my work at Stocksy, Tetra Images, and Getty.

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commercial shoot // spring equinox in brooklyn by jamie atlas

Shooting on the first day of spring, when the temps are still freezing but the hope is high, means finding pops of color anywhere you can! A few favorites from my commercial shoot last week, shot for Stocksy United in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn.

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shooting in winter by jamie atlas

Photography is all about light. And so the slushy grey days of mid-winter can seem like the death knell of creative inspiration. We produce commercial shoots every week, and I find it really challenging to stay inspired to keep shooting every time February rolls around. Where are the splashy bright puddles of golden summer sunshine?! But there is always beauty to find if you slow down enough to seek it out. In the slow, calm, cozy days of winter, there is beauty in the muted colors of dimmer days and the pastel effect of lower contrast light. Photographing in winter means finding warmth in a window and tracking down each sliver of sunshine. And my favorite of all, because the sun is lower in the sky, you can find delicious hazy flares even in the middle of the day. Anyone can take a pretty picture in golden hour on the beach, but it is deeply satisfying to discover the more subtle brightness in the stillness of mid-winter.

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color blocking // P I N K by jamie atlas

Next up in my totally random series of color galleries: PINK. I don’t think of myself as a real girlie-girl, in fact when I had a baby girl I went out of my way not to succumb to the overly pinky pinkification of everything and made a real effort to dress her in any other color possible. But I do find over and over again that I’m drawn to the right pop of fuchsia, blush, rose - peachy and creamy or bright and neon. It kind of makes me want to get some pink leg-warmers and go rollerskating with Beyoncé (that’s totally what I look like rollerskating, by the way). These are a few favorite pinks, mostly from the last few years.

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playlist // upbeat photoshoot mix by jamie atlas

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The images I love best are full of energy and bursts of emotion. To elicit that kind of moment (especially when you’re photographing models, who likely haven’t met you or each other before) you need ways of creating an environment that’s up-beat and free. Music, of course, is one of the best tools for setting a vibe, whether it’s moody and soulful, toe-tappy and happy, or anything in between. In 15 years of shooting, we’ve gone through plenty of different playlists - there was that year that Marisa and I ODed on Christmas Carols before Christmas ever came. And that month or so we had Beyoncé’s “4” playing on loop. Usually, our studio tunes are a mix of upbeat indie rock with a strong current of girl pop running through. And Beyoncé. Below is one such playlist, which I’ve been bopping around to lately. May it bring you happy, jump-around shoot day vibes suitable for twirling and laughing in the most photo-worthy ways!

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Click below to listen on Spotify!


commercial shoot // 3 year old buddies by jamie atlas

I am clearly partial to these models- one of them I birthed, the other I’ve known since she was just fluttery kicks in Marisa’s belly. Honestly, we avoid hiring 2 and 3 year old professional models for commercial work, because the age is just so unpredictable - it can be damn near impossible to produce much in a day, much less stick to a shoot script. So rearing your own models for this age group is preferable…it takes the pressure off to produce a lot, you can just get what you get and quit when they say so. Here’s what we were able to grab from a shoot day with these buddies last week. And here’s a tip for shooting 3 year olds: letting them throw Cheerios all over the room piques their interest for a bit :)

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color blocking // B L U E by jamie atlas

When I have a chance to stop hustling and constantly looking forward at the next things to shoot, shoot, shoot, it can be really satisfying to look b a c k over the archive of work I’ve created in the past, to cull through my body of work and see how images play differently next to each other. Instead of always pouring over Pinterest and Instagram, I can inspire my own damn self for a change! Ha. For no apparent reason (or for the best reason ever, of just entertaining myself), I decided to blog a series of galleries of my work organized by color. A lot of these were taken in 2018, but some are from a few years past. First up, B L U E…

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cocktail // ode to a negroni by jamie atlas

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I'm having a major love affair with Campari these days...the crisp and bitter punch of flavor is the perfect antidote to a grey winter day. A splash of Campari topped with seltzer is a lovely little aperitivo to whet your appetite while you cook up something warm and cozy- but my cocktail of choice, when it's time for something more festive, is a negroni. It's uniquely bitter and citrusy and bright - and editing the images from this recent commercial shoot has me counting down the days til Friday. Cheers!

CLASSIC NEGRONI

1 oz. gin

1 oz. Campari

1 oz. sweet vermouth

Combine the ingredients in an old-fashioned glass filled with ice. Stir well until chilled, twist a thin piece of orange peel over the drink, for aromatics, and use the peel as garnish.

 

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commercial shoots // my new home location by jamie atlas

I endured a few major changes in location last year - after my lifetime in NYC, my husband and I moved with our kiddos from Brooklyn to the suburbs (eek!) and after 10 years shooting in the same loft studio in Jersey City, Marisa and I packed up our props and said goodbye to our headquarters. Change is not my forte, and I was dreading the move on both fronts...but I have to say, I think I'm blossoming in the 'burbs! One perk to 'burb life is that living in a house is super lovely. When I pad down the stairs in my slippers for coffee in the morning, I feel like I've rented a quaint airbnb. And the house kills two birds with one stone, because it's also a perfect built-in location for the commercial photoshoots we do each week. We still miss our prop shelves and our Jersey City lunch orders (you forever have our hearts, Little Sandwich Shop!), but it's been a nice change to shoot in a home instead of building sets every week. Here are a few favorite images we've gotten from some recent commercial lifestyle shoots we've done in my new home:

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family session // may day newborn by jamie atlas

I've been so lucky to get a bunch of family sessions lately - I really love a chance to peek into a day of family life and find something unique and beautiful amidst the every day moments in someone's home. That's especially true of newborn sessions. Stepping into the home of a newborn instantly takes me back to those delicious, delirious days with my own newborn babies...only without so many hormonal tears or frantic Google searches on my part. It's really sweet and special to watch people literally becoming a family right before your eyes. Here are a few of my favorites from a family I had the pleasure of meeting most recently. 

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photographing newborns your own way by jamie atlas

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I'm not saying there's anything wrong with stuffing a newborn baby into a flowering can...

...but do we all have to shoot newborns that way? There seems to be a trend of propping babies up in jaunty poses, everyone wrapping them in the same nude gauze and holding up their heads or curling them up in baskets. If that highly propped and posed look is your thing, go for it! But there's nothing saying you have to photograph newborns in that style. 

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Finding your newborn style. Photographing newborns should be an extension of of your photographic style overall. For me, that means candid lifestyle moments. I aim to catch glimpses of the moments between "the moments" - not posed and premeditated, but hints of real life when families are just being together. Regardless of your style, you don't have to approach newborn photography any differently than you approach any subject - there is no right or wrong way to do it. If someone chooses you to capture this time for them, just make sure that they're familiar with your style and have the right expectations for the type of photography you shoot.

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9 universal tips for shooting newborns. Regardless of your photographic style, here are a few tips to help any newborn session go smoothly:

  • Be a force of calm. When you enter a home with a newborn in it, you are walking into a sacred, sensitive - and sleepy - place. Take your cue for the mood of the room when you get there. Wash your hands right away, talk in a hushed tone, and take the family's lead for how chatty or loud to be. Sometimes a mom is weepy for no reason, or is self-conscious about how she looks for photos, or is nervous about the baby "behaving" for a session - be as calmly encouraging and complimentary as you can to help put everyone at ease. The white noise from a sound machine can be helpful for covering up the noise of your camera shutter or your chatting while the baby is sleeping - most newborn households have one, or you can pop a little travel one like this into your camera bag to take with you.
  • Follow cues for feeding and sleep times. More than ever, you should bend to the natural family rhythm of what's going on during your time there. If the baby starts getting a little fussy, don't push through to get the shot you want - encourage mom to stop whenever she needs to, and to step in and comfort the little one whenever she wants to. If they stop to nurse, I often ask if they'd like me to capture some of that moment as well, explaining that I can shoot details of breastfeeding without showing anything explicitly, if they prefer. Or if you get the sense that a mother is more private, you can leave the room for a few minutes. You can create an intimate photo by shooting into the room from a hallway, to set the scene of what newborn days are like without being right on top of them while they feed.
  • Keep the shooting area warm. Especially if the you plan to shoot the baby naked or in a diaper, keep room temperature (and your hand temperature) in mind. If you shoot with available light, the sunny spot by a window is a great place to set up anyway. 
  • Bring a blanket or surface you like to shoot on. I've never walked into the home of a baby that doesn't have a surplus of blankets and swaddles around, but I always take a neutral, textured blanket and a plain white swaddle with me, just in case.
  • Don't forget the tiny parts. Once you've covered a shot, get in close and capture the little details - hands, feet, lips, even the tops of their fuzzy little heads, 
  • When in doubt, swaddle. I say this with a mother's love: newborn babies can look like funny little aliens! I love those smooshy little newborn faces, but the lack of neck control or fat rolls of older babies and those spindly arms and legs can make it hard to arrange them in a graceful way. Swaddling makes babies calm and comforted and makes them look like adorable baby burritos - it's a win win.
  • Shoot as much as you can in each pose. Don't disrupt a happy baby if you don't need to - once you've gotten the baby settled in a position, try to milk it before moving on and changing outfits or poses. You do the moving instead - get the shot you have in mind, then walk around and look at the baby from other angles. Changing your position and angle can make for an entirely different shot. Try shooting back lit instead, pull back and get it wide, or get close and grab some of those baby details.
  • Be flexible. The parents may have hired you, but the baby is your boss! More than any type of photo session, newborn sessions have a way of taking their own direction. It's good to prepare and have a general plan of action, but be ready for the day to go differently than your plan...babies do not always nap on cue, for example, and you may not have a chance to get all those peaceful resting photos you had in mind. The best plan to have is to just keep shooting. If they have to change onesies three times because of diaper blow outs, or are frantically pacing back and forth trying to shush a screaming baby, change your plan of action and capture these moments instead. 
  • Get mama in the frame. A new mother is often self conscious about having her picture taken. Her body feels foreign to her, she might still even be in pain, and she probably hasn't worn make-up or done her normal beauty routine in the last week or so. But a mother is the real rock star of those newborn days. Her life and identity have changed in an instant, as she experiences a new and all-consuming love, and she has had to dig deep to tap into more strength and energy than she's ever found before. This, more than anything, deserves to be documented. So, be gentle as you encourage her to get in the frame - and whatever you ask of her, keep it simple - but make an effort to include at least a few photos that capture the bond between mother and baby. Dad and siblings, too, of course!
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Happy shooting!

using foreground to give depth to your photography by jamie atlas

Life is rarely framed as neatly as we compose our photos. Sometimes that’s exactly what we love about photography – it lends a frame to a piece of life that we might otherwise miss, it elevates the moment. But sometimes, that neat framing removes us from the feeling of the moment all together. One way to maintain the depth and realism of a moment is to include a foreground in your composition. Rather than just focusing on your subject, consider what you’re shooting past.

I wrote a guest post over on the MCP Actions blog about creating a foreground when composing your photos. For the full post, and more photo examples, check it out HERE!

work and motherhood by jamie atlas

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"The key to that work-life balance, the holy grail of modern motherhood, is to scrap it all together, to simply come to terms with the fact that there is no such thing as balance. It’s more of a pendulum – you sway between the two roles, and if you can find a good rhythm in the back and forth that makes you feel happy and centered, then you’re killing it! Sometimes I do a great job with my career, and sometimes I nail motherhood – sometimes it happens in the same day, even! But never all at once. It’s important for women, whether they’re mothers or not, to remember that we can’t be all things to all people all of the time..."

Read more of my answers about work and motherhood over at the Blend Images blog, where they flattered me with an artist feature this month!

Below are some behind the scenes images from our set, where my producer Marisa and I always have a baby or two in tote:

preparing for your family photo session by jamie atlas

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You're longing to have meaningful pictures of your family, so you finally booked a photographer to capture your family in all your cute and cozy glory...but now you're totally nervous and dreading the shoot day. Don't worry! Most people feel timid before jumping in front of a camera (including me). But I've been around a lot of shoot days of all kinds, and I'm here to tell you- as soon as you get that first shot clicked, the nerves will dissipate. Promise. In the meantime, here are a few things to prepare yourself for a family photo session, so you're less anxious ahead of time and ready to get that first shot clicked!

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To Do (and not do) Beforehand

Prepping the kiddos. First off, there's no homework to do! But you can describe the shoot to your kids beforehand, just so they understand someone will be hanging out and taking pictures. It doesn't hurt to make the event sound like something fun and special. Using words like "photo shoot," "director," or "model" can take the mystery out of it and make it all a fun dress-up kind of game to look forward to. // Don't make them practice smiles or poses! The best photos are made when little ones can just relax and be themselves.

Scheduling. Try to keep nap and food times in mind when scheduling your shoot (I know you're programmed to do this already!) - having your picture taken is a chore if you're hangry at the time. // Don't force it. It goes without saying that cranky babies trump any kind of beautiful light...if your little one is a nightmare before dinner every evening, it's best to skip "golden hour" in favor of a more cheerful time of day.

Photo inspiration. Think a little bit about the types of photos you most love and the moments in your own everyday lives that you'd like captured. Feel free to share images that resonate with you with your photographer ahead of time. Poke around on Pinterest if you have some time, to get an idea of what you most want to achieve - keeping in mind, of course, that if you've chosen a photographer already, your shoot will naturally fall into his or her style and strengths.

What to wear. Think about what you feel most comfortable in...and also pretty or handsome, of course, but now is not the time to break out fancy duds you don't usually wear. Feel yourself. This is especially true for your kids - put them in something they've warn before that allows them to be themselves. // Don't go too matchy matchy with it - you can try to harmonize your outfits with each other, but don't over think it.

To Do (and not do) At The Shoot

Relax! I know, I know, that is such an easier-said-than done kind of thing. But seriously, now's the time to channel your inner diva. You picked a photographer, you packed the snacks, you got everyone there (with shoes on, no less?!) - you're a parenting rock star. Now let the photographer worry about the rest - this is all just a typical day of work for him or her. // Don't overthink it. Try to let go of any thoughts about your upper arm flab or your daughter's "good side." Take this time to just be with your family, and let your photographer find and capture all the beauty that's there.

Directing the kiddos. Feel free to tell your little ones ahead of time to be "good listeners," but let your directing stop there. You'll be a better "model" if you spend your time relaxed and enjoying yourself, rather than talking or frowning as you direct others. Plus you never know what the photographer is seeing through the viewfinder, so it's best to let him or her direct (or choose not to direct) what's going on around you.

Most importantly: Don't sweat it if your kids are acting like maniacs! I promise you, we've seen it all! Your photographer has chosen to photograph families because he or she loves the silly, messy chaos that comes with it. Plus, you'd be surprised how beautiful photos can be taken even while the chaos ensues.

Most of all, of course, try to enjoy yourself!

Click HERE for a free printable download of this list. Break a leg! xjamie

 

capturing candid moments when photographing children by jamie atlas

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There’s nothing more unnatural than the crusty position of a child’s mouth while he groans “cheeeeese” for the 18th time in a row. The moments most worth capturing are ones that have a breath of reality, spontaneity, and whimsy to them. There are a couple simple techniques, way better than yelling cheese, for capturing that spontaneity in our images.

I wrote a guest post over at the MCP Actions blog about capturing these types of candid moments when photographing children - for the complete post, including more photo examples and tips like "please, please don't ever ask them to say cheese," click here!